Cream Fudge and how I almost fudged it up, and a celebratory giveaway

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Cream Fudge and how I almost fudged it up, and a celebratory giveaway

Serves: Makes ~100 pieces
Cost: ~€2.20
Preparation time: ~5 hours total
Calories: ~50 Calories per piece

Howdy folks. I had mentioned in my previous post that I was going to post some photos of a trip I took last year but it suddenly hit me… today is my 200th post, nay, I should be more specific – my 200th recipe post. I’ll spare you the emotional speech about how I couldn’t have done this without the support of my wife and cat. I’ll just simply say that little did I think, one and a half years ago, that a day would come when I’d written not just 100 recipes, but 200. What a long, delicious journey it’s been so far – I’ve explored some English traditions, shown you some glimpses of Sweden in winter and yet barely scratched the surface of the world of food. Thank you to everyone who takes the time to stop by and read my posts. As a way of saying thank you, I’m going to do a little giveaway in today’s post, details to follow. I hope you all take part; good luck, and thank you again!

Giveaway? OMG YES GIMME! What can I get?

The first item up for grabs is 2 x 14cm Le Creuset Cocottes in a colour of your choosing. Please note it’s the ceramic version, and not the cast-iron one :D and they will be given away as one.

Le Creuset Cocotte

The second item is the outrageously useful book “What’s A Cook To Do?” – Think of it like “life hacks” but for the kitchen. It teaches you all sorts of things which people should really know – how to carve a whole fish, how to rescue flavourless fruits, how to make perfectly tender lobster – 484 tips of useful information covering pretty much every topic.

What's A Cook To Do?

Ok, I want in!

Want to enter? Here’s how:

  • (Required) Leave a comment below

In addition to this, you can gain extra entries by doing the following. Please leave a separate comment below (one per action) stating which you have done:

The giveaway is available to everyone, regardless of geographic location, and will close at 8pm French time on Sunday 10th June 2012. Two winners will have their comment number selected using random.org and announced in a post the next day. I should tell you as well, if you don’t want to take part in the giveaway, please say so in your comment! Please remember to leave an extra comment per action (Facebook etc) you take – even if you already “Like” me – logistically it’s difficult to work out who does what and adjust numbers and so forth accordingly!

Disclaimer:

This giveaway is run and paid for entirely by me.

 ~~~

Onwards to today’s recipe though, and today I’ll be making cream fudge. Undeterred by last week’s nougat fail (well, not utter failure, but not something I’d probably pay money for!) I decided to give my new straight-sided pan a whirl (incidentally, if you’re looking for a new pan, I cannot recommend it highly enough! It’s more expensive than one you might pick up from IKEA, but my God, it’s a thing of beauty. Heavy, deep and sturdy. None of this flimsy aluminium junk which is so prevalent these days. I wasn’t expecting it to be so well made, but I’d definitely put it into a “buy it for life” category and I can see myself still baking with this in 20 years time).

Remember my post from last year for Cherry Brandy? I’ve had the leftover cherries sitting in a pot, covered in a bit of extra brandy ever since I bottled up the booze in December and they’ve just been begging to be used. Since I’m not much of an ice-cream eater (I love it, I just don’t eat much of it for some reason) I thought they would undoubtedly go fabulously into a fudge – kind of like rum and raisin. I only had about 150g of cherries though so I bulked them out with some raisins too.

A lot of recipes only use milk in fudge. Nonsense, I say. It’s not like fudge is a “healthy snack”. If you’re making it, then you’ve already committed to the fact that you’re shortly going to be in possession of a billion calorie tray of tooth-melting awesomeness, so you may as well do it properly. Fudge is often made using clotted cream in England, and damn tasty it is too. Unable to easily get my hands on clotted cream in France, I opted for regular cream, but it still gave the final product a fantastic, rich flavour.

Cream Fudge

All was going well – I’d managed to melt the ingredients down and they were boiling up nicely; the temperature was slowly rising. The maximum temperature in the “soft-ball” stage is 116 degrees Celsius and I didn’t want to hit the maximum, so when I’d hit about 114 degrees I removed it from the stove, waited a bit and then stirred in the fruit. Into my tray it went and then I waited. I waited, and I waited and finally, after 5 hours it had set… sort of. I left it overnight  and realised then that what I had in the pan wasn’t really fudge. It was a loose, moist, crumbly mixture with a very crystalline consistency and small pockets of liquid surrounding the cherries. Gah! A quick bit of Googling and I discovered that in these cases, you can actually melt the fudge down again, no harm no foul. Bring it back up to the boil and heat to the desired temperature once again (I actually went above the soft-ball stage this time, to about 117 degrees Celsius, though it’s possible my thermometer is slightly inaccurate). As for the crystalline consistency? Well I learned in my nougat making that glucose syrup prevents this, so in went a big dollop of that too.

The result? This is, to me, what fudge is all about. It’s crumbly, it’s rich, and sure, it’s sweet, but you’re not supposed to eat a ton of it. It’s the kind of thing you perch a square of on a saucer next to your after-dinner coffee. Best of all, it’s an awesome gift – seriously, who wouldn’t appreciate a box of this? Future attempts are going to involve layering and flavouring, though I think I’ll reserve that for Christmas gifts, since late Spring/early Summer isn’t an ideal time for sugar-boiling! Just as a side-note, I found out as well that if you can’t get glucose syrup, you can add corn syrup, so now you have no excuse! I’ve been sure to correct the recipe below to fix my mistakes, including the glucose syrup and temperature!

Enjoy the fudge everyone, have a great day and see you back on Sunday!

Cream Fudge

Video Recipe

Ingredients

Cream Fudge ingredients

  • 700g Sugar
  • 300ml Cream
  • 300ml Milk
  • 200g Butter
  • 100ml Glucose or Corn Syrup
  • ~300g Raisins (optional)

You’ll also need

  • A Sugar Thermometer

Instructions

  1. Start off by placing the sugar, milk, cream, butter and glucose or corn syrup into a large, deep pan. Melt the sugar and butter down over a medium heat, stirring all the time until you can no longer feel the sugar crunching under your spoon. If you are adding raisins to the fudge then stir them into the hot mixture now.
    Melting the butter, sugar and liquid
  2. Place a Sugar Thermometer over the edge of your pan and raise the temperature. Bring the mixture to the boil before lowering the temperature slightly and continue heating the mixture through until it reaches about 116 degrees Celsius.
    Mixing in the cherries
  3. Immediately remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly for 10 minutes. Stir well and then pour into a lightly greased baking tray. Store in a cool place for a few hours until completely set. If you find for some reason it has not set sufficiently then you can melt it down again and re-heat to ~116 degrees Celsius, or a bit higher, to ensure a good consistency.
    Letting the fudge cool
  4. Once completely cool, cut into small squares and enjoy or give away as gifts!
    Cream Fudge
    Cream Fudge

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140 Comments

  1. Fudge is one of my biggest guilt pleasures. As you say, one’s not meant to eat loads of it but I dare anyone to try and stop at one piece – impossible! I think your batch looks great, it’s trickier than people think it is to make so kudos to you! Lovely prizes too, I already subscribe so happy to opt out of your competition to let some other lucky person win.

    Reply
    • Thanks Noodle – if you’re sure you want to opt out… you’re more than welcome to participate… the more the merrier :)

      Reply
  2. OMG this fudge looks so delicious I was almost like what the fudge? :P hehe

    Reply
    • Thanks Nada – I actually tried to make my own, I think following that recipe too (yeah, just checked the link… it’s the one I tried). It was a dismal failure. I cooked it for the time she said… nothing. I cooked it in total for ~20 hours and nothing happened, so in the end I just gave up :(

      Reply
  3. I am now following you on facebook

    Reply
  4. subscribed on youtube

    Reply
  5. Following on twitter

    Reply
  6. Already subscribed by email..

    Reply
  7. And I would loveeee to win that book! OMG pleaseeee give it to me :)

    Reply
  8. I’ve just enjoyed my main course and I’m looking around for something sweet and there is NOTHING in this house can you believe it! And then you torture me with these images of sweet, soft, delicious fudge. I would love some. I will definitely be cooking this! Congrats on your 200th post! I have a way to go before I catch up to you. What a wonderful giveaway. I have already subscribed but I just liked you on FB – and I would have done that sooner but I didn’t know you were on FB! xx

    Reply
    • Thanks so much Charlie – do let me know if you give the fudge a try… I hope it works out well :)

      Reply
  9. Congratulations, Charles! And thank you for organising the giveaway. I am still a very happy user of the excellent knife from your first giveaway!
    I loooooove fudge and this is why I don’t make it. It’s a killer for someone like me who tries to be reasonable with sweets because contrary to some heavy floury cakes I just couldn’t take a slice of fudge and forget it. I would have it for breakfast, for lunch, dinner and every time I enter the kitchen. I wouldn’t mind a small bite from time to time though. It’s a pity I’m not your neighbour: I would come with a jar of some pickles or jam and ask if I can have a square of fudge in return ;-) (But just one!).

    Reply
    • Hi Sissi, and thank you! I go through periods of suddenly feeling like I have to eat a lot of sugar and in that time I can easily swallow about 15 pieces of fudge, so it’s true – not something good to keep often in the kitchen!!

      Reply
  10. Fudge is my husbands’ favorite candy. It’s always good to have another one. Nice giveaway, I would love to have the Le Creuset Cocottes, I can think of so many different uses for them. The book also looks very interesting. Already subscribe to you by email.

    Reply
    • Thanks Heike – do you make it often for your husband? I’d love to know how you make yours… it’s fun to see how other people are doing it too!

      Reply
      • I have actually not made fudge for him yet, he’s always made it himself or raided his mothers’ stash.
        I did buy him a kit by Carnation at one of those Super stores (here in the US). It contained all the ingredients for 2 batches of fudge and he made it, but omitting the mini marshmallows. I think he would’ve like it better if he had used them.
        I’ll definitely make some this Christmas season. It’s way too hot here now to think about making or eating fudge.

        Reply
        • “raided his mother’s stash”

          Haha – that made me chuckle :D
          You know, I actually never had fudge with marshmallows in before – I just can’t imagine what it must be like… Agreed though… I’ll be saving my candy making for winter now… it’s way too warm these days to fiddle about with boiling sugar!

        • The marshmallows are supposed to make the fudge, hmmmm maybe fluffier, I’m not sure sure how to describe it. But if you don’t use them, the fudge comes out a bit thin and dry, I think. I’ll figure it out in a few months. :)

  11. Following your youtube channel.

    Reply
  12. Congrats on your 200th post, Charles, well done. That’s outstanding, and since I’m just coming up on my 100th, something to aspire to! The color of your fudge reminds me of penuche, which has pecans and no fruit. I’m loving the cherries in this, though and plan to check out your cherries in brandy momentarily. I subscribe via email already, and both your giveaways look awesome. :)

    Reply
    • Thanks Betsy, and big congratulations on your 100th post for whenever it is. It’s fun to celebrate these milestones!

      Reply
      • Thanks, Charles, I just posted the 100th on Sunday night, but alas, seem to be having a few WP technical issues with it.

        Reply
  13. I also just liked you on FB, and didn’t know you were there. I’m admiring your follow buttons…may have to check that out! ;)

    Reply
  14. Congratulations on your two hundredth post, Charles! Well done. I was wondering why you needed to put milk or cream in fudge (I make it with butter and marshmallows) and then I saw it was because you make it without any chocolate in it. Ah. Vanilla fudge. I like the inclusion of brandied cherries in it — I wonder if I could preserve cherries in rum, which is what I keep around. Hmm. I would like it with nuts in it, too — I like additions that provide a contrast to the sweetness and smoothness. As you know, I already subscribe.

    Reply
    • RE: Using milk/cream … the ‘traditional’ fudge recipe uses milk or cream as the base rather than the modern ‘quick’ versions which just require melting marshmallows to thicken or set the fudge. The fact that it’s not a chocolate fudge doesn’t really have any bearing on it. :)

      Reply
      • I honestly couldn’t remember putting milk or cream in fudge (we used to make it the old-fashioned way) — I only remembered chocolate, sugar and butter. I asked my Mom and she said we put milk in it. I went to marshmallow fudge because its a surer set and requires no beating. What I don’t like about quick fudge is that it is often too sweet because of the sugar in the marshmallows.

        Reply
        • And the milk should be full fat (homogenized in the US/Canada) as I’ve tried it with 2% and gotten a grainier product than an earlier homo milk version. Some recipes in fact use whipping cream or light cream (aka half and half).

    • Hi Sharyn, as A_Boleyn mentioned, indeed it’s for that. Actually, after people started saying it, I looked it up, I’d never heard of fudge with marshmallows inside!! I learned a new thing from that :D

      Reply
      • Well, there are two kinds of marshmallow fudge, there is regular fudge in which you melt the marshmallows with the butter and chocolate to stabilize the fudge, and then there is Rocky Road Fudge, where you mix in miniature marshmallows and nuts just before the fudge sets, for a chunky effect.

        Reply
        • They actually both sound awesome. I wasn’t so sure about it when I heard of “marshmallow fudge” but the way you describe it makes it seem fantastic :D

  15. I had the pleasure to try it, sooo decadent and delicious.

    Reply
  16. CONGRATULATIONS! and what a delicious way to celebrate!! (I hope you saved me a piece)! On another note, I’ve never had clotted cream and hope to soon ;) I wish you 2 miiiilllion more amazing anniversaries ^.^

    XOXO

    Reply
    • Thanks Squishy – if you’ve never had clotted cream… omg, make sure you do! You’ll think you died and went to heaven, seriously!

      Reply
  17. Congratulations and enhorabuena! Wish I´d come across your blog earlier but I am slowly catching up. I would love to win any of your gorgeous prizes but if I were to be lucky, I think you´d have to take out a mortgage to mail them to Spain! Anyway, on to your wonderful recipe. I adore fudge (and clotted cream but I have to wait until I am in the UK for that delicious treat) but have never had too much luck with it. Am going to give it another go, especially as I too have some lovely cherries in brandy waiting for their “moment”. And when I have popped the 10th piece of fudge in my mouth I am going to entirely ignore the fact that I have just eaten 500 calories worth of scrumminess ;)

    Reply
    • Hi Chica, thank you so much! I was actually talking with some Spanish colleagues recently and they said clotted cream was quite common in Spain… I’ve never really seen it here so I don’t know how reliable that is though!

      Reply
      • Charles, this was the first e-mail I read this morning and it got me all excited! Please ask your colleagues what it´s known as in Spain as I really have only ever seen nasty cooking or eating cream in long life cartons here!

        Reply
        • Hi Chica, I spoke to a colleague again just now (she has 4 names so she’s legit’ Spanish, lol!) – she assures me that clotted cream is “Nata” in Spain. Apparently it’s really common and eaten with strawberries there?

        • Four names – oh yes, definitely Spanish then! Sadly nata is just the generic name for cream, so I think my hopes have been dashed at the thought of finding clotted cream. Never mind, I will gorge in the UK ;)

        • Aw, damn – they were really adamant it was the right stuff… The told me it was like creme fraiche, but much thicker, almost like butter. Oh well – sorry to get your hopes up! Still, you could give a try at making it yourself…!!

  18. Congratulations on your 200th post.

    I love eating fudge so, when I make it, I have to give most of it away or else I’ll eat the whole thing. Same thing with pralines. I’ve made vanilla, chocolate and chocolate/mint versions and my biggest challenge is getting it to the right temperature. A GOOD candy thermometer is a must. I’ve never used fruit, only nuts, but I’ve really enjoyed the black forest version (chocolate and maraschino cherry/pink layers) and hope to make it myself one day.

    Reply
    • Hi A_Boleyn, totally agree – I make these things almost exclusively to giveaway… it’s not really good to make them just for oneself :D

      I found it hard as hell to find a good candy thermometer. I was prepared to spend anything up to, like, €50 for one but really couldn’t find one. Ideally I wanted a digital one but none of them seemed to have good reviews. In the end I went with a cheap analogue one… seems to do the job well enough!

      Reply
      • The cheapy non-electronic one I have is ok though I still double check with the cold water soft ball test.

        By the way, had a recipe fail (new recipe, late at night etc etc) in the cherry almond fudge I attempted a few days ago. Posted the picture and when I get over being ‘annoyed’ with myself, will go back to my old fudge recipe, whose bugs I’ve pretty much worked out and add the small handful of maraschino cherries I have left to it.

        I’ll give you the link as I’ve made about 7 posts in the last week and it might take you a while to get through them. I need a break. :)

        http://a-boleyn.livejournal.com/97530.html

        Reply
  19. Your fudge looks sinfully delicious, Charles! Congratulations on 200 posts! :)

    Reply
  20. To think I just read an article which says “cut sugar totally out of your diet”……….

    Not happening.

    LOVED the recipe. My boys will go nuts if I make that. They will sure elevate me from ‘best cook’ to ‘bestest cook eva’……

    Reply
      • Hi Minnie – Absolutely… US, Australia, China, Antarctica… I like to make sure no-one is left out :)

        Reply
        • hahaha!! Thank you :P I was just kidding. I subscribed everywhere irrespective,though I wouldn’t mind getting those beautiful cocottes :D

  21. thanks for this giveaway!

    Reply
  22. liked you on fb

    Reply
  23. Dear Charles,

    Congrats on your 200th recipe post! Your cream fudge looks dangerously addictive. I didn’t realise there is a ceramic version of the cast iron pot. I love my cast iron pot as it takes half the time of a normal pot and saves so much energy as well and each time, the stews and curries come out so beautifully.

    Reply
    • Thanks Chopinand – I’ve got a huge cast-iron pot myself here… I just adore it. There’s something so nice about big, heavy, thick pots isn’t there?!

      Reply
  24. Congratulations on 200 posts!!

    Reply
  25. ohh. Lovely recipe and lovely giveaway! I agree – fudge should at least be made with cream because honestly it is a wonderful treat!

    Reply
    • Thanks Claudia – totally agree… it’s really common this way in England and Scotland, but not so much elsewhere it seems :/

      Reply
  26. Whoo hoo! Congrats on the 200th post! You made me curious and I checked how many posts I have written. It says 218… darn it. I missed my 200th mark. LOL! Thanks for the wonderful giveaway!

    I actually didn’t know how to make fudge… :-) It was fun following how you make it. Your video is quite addicting. hehehe.

    Reply
    • Thanks so much Nami – on the subject of videos… they’re going to be getting better soon :)

      Reply
  27. Nonsense to milk I say – hee.hee… you sure know how to make a yummy dessert Charles and how unique with the raisins, I’ve not had that before in fudge. These look like little cubes of heavenliness!

    A big congrats on your 200th post Charles and may you continue to entertain and wow us with many, many more! :)

    Loving your offerings too – le Creuset products are outstanding – can’t wait!

    Reply
    • Thanks so much Kelly – yummy dessert maybe… healthy… erk, not so much :D

      I’m surprised you never had raisins in your fudge before – it’s quite a common addition in my experience… but then maybe it’s a weird regional English thing :D

      Reply
  28. I know how to appreciate this fudge and am not worried about the calories, will take a box, please and thanks.
    Congratulations on your 200 posts!!!!!

    Reply
    • Thanks Norma – nice to know there are some people who will appreciate a good candy for what it is and not spend every moment fretting about a few extra calories!

      Reply
      • My philosophy is go for the real deal or don’t bother.

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  29. I subscribe to your post via e-mail.

    Reply
  30. Congratulations on your 200th post! That’s a great achievement by my books. I’m wondering if I could reach there myself :)
    Anyway, this post is absolutely a killer. I’m trying real hard to not look and concentrate on those lovely giveaway goodies instead … NOT WORKING!!! Drool …

    Reply
    • Thanks Ping! I’m looking forward to another 200… 300… so much fun :)

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  31. Already liked you on FB :)

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  32. My cat likes your cat :)

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  33. Charles, looks gorgeous! And I’m so glad to see non-chocolate fudge. Everyone seems to think fudge has to be chocolate, and it just doesn’t. And I’m with you – one little piece with the after-dinner coffee. Fudge is definitely fussy about the temperature. If you have doubts about your thermometer, also do the manual test for soft-ball stage. Oh about those cocottes – make mine Flame!

    Reply
    • Hi Jean – yeah, I was getting confused because I had some comments from here and colleagues who all got confused when I was talking about the fudge. To be honest, this is the only fudge I know :)

      Reply
  34. Congratulations on your 200th post; that is a great accomplishment Charles, particularly knowing how much effort you put into each one, with the ingredient photos all the way to the impressive play by play instructional videos!
    What a lovely and generous give away; should I win the Le Creuset dishes, I would like to give my winnings to Maria at A Boleyn as I already have a set of four and she had commented once that she would love to have them but are too expensive to justify. But I would LOVE the book, which looks very interesting.
    The candy…you do love to tease! I am really trying not to eat sugar these days, but I would cave for this sweet. I love well made fudge and from the photos these look incredible. And I really like that you made them smallish squares so it’s not overly sweet all at once. They do look melt in your mouth. Now I am going to work out and try and get these out of my mind.

    Reply
      • Following on Twitter!

        Reply
    • Hi Eva, thanks so much and you’re so kind to want to give the win to A_Boleyn if you won – it made me feel bad in the end that you didn’t win – you have a big heart :)

      Reply
  35. The fudge looks delicious!Really craving it now.

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  36. Following on twitter.

    Reply
  37. Like you on facebook.

    Reply
  38. Liked you folks on Facebook!

    Reply
  39. Following you on Twitter!

    Reply
  40. Happily subscribed to email subscriptions!

    Reply
  41. Fudge with raisins? Now that’s a real twist. I do like the way you described it as being like run raisin. Rum raisin ice cream was my mom’s favorite and I loved it as well so I know I’d love this! Congratulation on this being your 200th post!!!!! That’s awesome!

    Reply
    • Hi MJ – I remember my mother made some rum raisin ice-cream once. I don’t know whether it was just my memory “bigging it up” but I remember that ice-cream as being the best darn ice-cream I’d ever had :)

      Reply
  42. I just liked you on FB and I can’t believe that I hadn’t done that already!

    Reply
  43. I now follow you on Twitter. Again – what took me so long!

    Reply
  44. I already subscribe to your wonderful posts via email.

    Reply
  45. I now subscribe to your YouTube channel which I didn’t even know you had! I obviously have some catching up to do.

    Reply
  46. We must be on the same wavelength – I just did a fudge post myself!

    Reply
    • Nice, I’ll have to go check it out, thanks Sarah :)

      Reply
  47. Great giveaway! I will have to make this for my boys, really who doesn’t love fudge? I’d probably be the one that would fudge it up! LOL

    Reply
    • Haha, thanks Lisa – let me know if you give it a try – given the post recipe, I’m wondering now if a more appropriate giveaway would have been a candy thermometer, lol :D

      Reply
  48. I follow you on twitter!

    Reply
  49. I “like” you on FB!

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  50. Great save on the fudge. Ain’t Google great? The fudge looks perfect to me and I love the cherries that you added. I’ve never had fudge with cherries. Hey, congrats on your 200th recipe that’s amazing. Have a lovely weekend Charles and I hope the weather isn’t too warm. We finally got a good dose of rain this week, everything is singing.

    Reply
    • Thanks Suzi – you say “hope it isn’t too warm”… lol, it’s been doing nothing but raining since then to be honest. I’m hoping for a bit of sun soon! :D

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  51. I subscribe to you already via e-mail.

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  52. Following you on Twitter, my friend!

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  53. The fear of recrystalization is what keeps me from trying a classic fudge recipe. I will have to use your hints and give it a shot :) My family just loves fudge.

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    • Thanks Liz – the glucose does a great job… really recommend it!

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  54. I am going to try this in the Winter. It is too hot here and I don’t have time right now. I am very curious about having rasins and/or cherries in my fudge. I would love to win! I have too good posts and two good baking dishes. The other stuff is just OK! Anyway…I hope I add myself to your you tube channel. I did try. If it didn’t work I will have my kids help me later. :P

    Reply
    • he he he, not post pots…

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    • Hi Debra – yeah, I can imagine this isn’t the best thing to cook when it’s scalding hot outside. I suffer for my art, lol :D

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  55. My mom would be in heaven with homemade fudge. I’ve always marveled at it in specialty shops, but since I’m not a chocolate eater I’ve never given any a try. I probably should. Perhaps it’s something I would enjoy. In fact, the next time I’m in one of those shops, I’m trying some. And perhaps if I like it, I’ll end up making some too. I do know that I’m making your pasta this week though! YUM!

    And congrats on 200 posts! Woo hoo! I completely forgot about that milestone this year. Ah well. We’ll come up with something else to celebrate I’m sure. Fabulous giveaways. You are so generous Charles!

    Reply
    • Hi Kristy – no fear… this fudge has no chocolate inside so you can scoff it to your heart’s content. I was confused actually… it seems fudge in America has chocolate and/or marshmallows to set it? I’ve never heard of this in Europe… nice to learn new things!

      Reply
  56. I follow you on FB.

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  57. I subscribe via email too. :)

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  58. Home made fudge! wow!
    that sounds heavenly but I doubt one could stop at one or even a dozen!
    Congratulations on your 200th recipe post..what a wonderful milestone :)

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    • Thanks so much Sawsan :) Feels good to hit 200!

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  59. Would you believe that I have never made fudge. My husband doesn’t care for sweets that much and I am afraid I would end up eating the whole thing myself. I think you cherries must really make the fudge outstanding.

    Reply
    • Doesn’t care for sweets? My goodness… well, I find the best thing to do is immediately give most of it away… that way you can’t be tempted!

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  60. Wahoo! what an awesome giveaway! I love Le Crueset. I am keeping my fingers crossed. thank you for the chance to win.

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  61. Like Five Euro food on Facebook.

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  62. New email subscriber.

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  63. Congratulations on your 200th post!! The giveaway prizes sound amazing so do count me in :) The fudge looks good too – never been a fan but recently I’ve grown to like it.

    Reply
    • Thanks BA – I can understand not all being a fan… it is really sweet!

      Reply
  64. liked on facebook from Ros Bakingaddict

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  65. following on twitter from @bakingaddict

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  66. So glad I got directed here in time for this comp!! So generous of you to give away such a beautiful prize and is not restricted in geographic location! Love fudge, will try this soon. Have already recommended this blog to a friend who is living in Switzerland at the moment and should find it helpful.

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  67. You’re going to laugh at this one. I don’t normally enter contests “from away” because I just don’t think it’s fair – I’m a long way from anywhere.

    However, I received this IM from my husband who doesn’t read my blog very often. He’s been up since the crack of dawn and when I turned my computer on it said, “did you enter this? http://www.fiveeurofood.com/index.php/2012/05/cream-fudge-and-how-i-almost-fudged-it-up-and-a-celebratory-giveaway/

    I said, “No, I’m sure I didn’t, why?

    He said, “Well, you should enter it!”

    He liked the book.

    I explained why and said, “You know, they sell that book.”

    …and he said, “yes, but you know, we’re poor.”

    So congratulations and I subscribe to everything and winning the book would be nice. LOL Read that in a very low, Australian accent please.

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    • Haha, thanks for the chuckle Maureen – it’s even better because now I know how your husband sounds (I guess it was him who narrated the video for your plugin, right?)

      I’m sorry you didn’t win this time… next time perhaps?!

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      • LOL yes, John has the Australian accent in the family. I have an American accent, plus I sound like a woman. :)

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